The Incredible Years® Blog


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European Incredible Years® (EIY) Network for Implementation and Research in Incredible Years (Written by Carolyn Webster-Stratton)

European IY group_2746Thirty-two people from Norway, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Netherlands, Portugal, Scotland, Slovenia, England and Wales met late May in Bergen, Norway to discuss new research with IY programs and dissemination principles. I (Carolyn) am delighted to meet these researchers, administrators and IY mentors and to talk with them about grant deadlines, translations, research measures and new studies.

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There are many presentations about promising new studies. Brenda Renz, IY parent mentor from Scotland, describes their plan for motivating high risk parents of 4-year old children by providing IY Basic Parent Training. 786 families have been enrolled and pre, post–data shows that 81% of parents had improved behavior problem scores and 62% of children had moved out of the clinical range.

Marija Anderluh, a child psychiatrist from Slovenia, discussed her efforts to bring the Incredible Years parent program to her country. Already 20 groups leaders have been trained and they are offering 10 parent groups!

Frances Gardner from Oxford University presented pooling data from 14 trials across Europe about who benefits the most from IY Parenting programs to reduce disruptive child behavior. She discussed the effects of poverty, joblessness, parent mental health, child comorbid problems, ethnicity and geographical location on outcomes.

Piia Karjalainen presented her doctoral research design to evaluate the IY Parent program for child welfare referred families.

IMG_9074 croppedFinally, I am able to introduce Wally’s mother, Carmen Communicator, to present information about the birth of three new Incredible Years® programs – one for day care providers of young children (1-5 years), another for parents with children on the autism spectrum, and a third for preschool teachers working with children with language delays as well as children on the spectrum.

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The European IY Network (EIY Network) is comprised of IY implementors, researchers, and IY experts from across Europe. The EIY Network aims to do the following:

  • Network with each other to form a supportive IY community throughout Europe to promote IY implementation with fidelity.
  • Share idea and experiences with implementation and research in IY series.
  • Generate and expand upon new ideas and initiatives, and apply for funding, in order to contribute to future research of IY.
  • Share expertise and experiences of IY to inform policies and practice in their own countries.
  • Discuss needs and opinions in order to devise common formulations, and bring those to the attention of the Incredible Years® Headquarters in Seattle.

This is an exciting group and I am so pleased to see how they have taken the collaborative process to the next level. The pooled data study Frances presented points the way to how collaborative research can enhance our understanding of how IY programs can help families of all cultures, ethnicities and socio-economic backgrounds.

Written by Carolyn Webster-Stratton
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Fathers and Parenting Groups (New Research)

father and son'For parents attending parenting skills groups, it is always encouraged that both partners be involved in the group when possible. This joint effort allows parents to be on the same page and provides consistency for the child. However, there is a lack of research looking specifically at the effects of fathers attending parenting groups.

Recently a new study was published by Tataiana Homen at the University of Coimbra, Portugal, evaluating the impact of the The Incredible Years® (IY) preschool parent program on fathers. In this study, the fathers of thirty-six children were randomly assigned to receive either the IY program or a control group. Researchers then reported on the father’s parenting skills and their children’s behavior.

Results from before the program and six months later showed significant improvements for the fathers attending the IY Parenting Groups. Not only did the fathers’ positive parenting skills improve, but the children’s prosocial behaviors benefited as well! Additionally, these fathers reported an improvement in their family’s quality of life, which is especially important. The fathers were highly involved as shown by great attendance rates. They reported high satisfaction with the program in terms of how their children’s behavior improved. The mothers’ reports followed the same trends as the fathers. 8-4B-3

These promising results suggest that father involvement in the parent programs may further promote social support in the family and increase consistency in parenting between mothers and fathers, thereby improving long term positive outcomes for children’s development.


1. Homem, T.C., et al., A Pilot Study with the Incredible Years Parenting Training: Does it Work for Fathers of Preschoolers with Oppositional Behavior Symptoms. Fathering: A Journal of Theory, Research, and Practice about Men as Fathers, 2014. 12(3).

Learn more about research on the evidence-based Incredible Years Programs from our research library!


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Parenting Program Researched as a Home Visit Intervention

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IMG_2323 - Version 2Renda Dionne (certified group leader) and her colleagues have completed a randomized control group study using the home based Incredible Years (IY) parent program (Basic Preschool) with American Indian families with children (ages 3-10 years). Their approach involved a motivational phase, which set a historical context for parents’ current difficulties, and an intervention phase, which linked the IY principles and skills within cultural traditions, beliefs and values.

The program was delivered in 11 home visits, each lasting approximately 90 minutes. The home visiting coaches used the IY collaborative approach (without modification) including watching video vignettes, role play practices and homework assignments. With every skill taught, culturally based stories were offered to create a stronger connection to the skill.

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The Incredible Years Parent Program being implemented as a Home Visit model

For example, child-directed play was linked to respect for others, praise was linked to honoring others, limit setting linked to historical trauma, and prevention to ceremony.  Preliminary evidence looks promising with significant improvements in observations of parenting and child behavior in the intervention condition compared with the delayed-intervention group.

The majority of participants reported high levels of satisfaction with the program.  Given that historically few American Indians have taken part in research studies, we are excited about these findings and the potential for implementing the program with the American Indian population. It is particularly innovative they way researchers integrated a cultural approach as an adjunct to the Incredible Years program.

Click here to read the article!
Dionne, R., Davis, B., Sheeber, L., and Madrigal, L. 2009. 
Initial Evaluation of a Cultural Approach to Implementation of Evidence-based Parenting Interventions in American Indian Communities  Journal of Community Psychology, V.37.7. 911-921. DOI: 10.1002/jcop.20336

Want to learn more about implementing the Incredible Years Programs as a Home Visiting Model? Click here!


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Young Children’s Vocabulary Skills Predicted by Economic Factors (Follow up)

Hello friends!

Earlier this week we shared a guest post from Peter Loft, Certified Incredible Years Trainer. Mr. Loft discussed his response to an article in the NY Times which asserted the value of early childhood education in connection to reducing economic inequality, poverty, and crime.

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For those interested in this topic, we would like to share some further reading. Motoko Rich wrote an article just a few days prior to Kristoff’s article, titled “Language-Gap Study Bolsters a Push for Pre-K.”

This article examines new research from Anne Fernald, who found that young children from affluent families had far more advanced vocabularies than those from economically disadvantaged families. This gap began in children as young as 18 months old.

These studies and recent articles highlight the importance of early education and verbal interaction with very young children. Next week, we will begin a series of three guest posts from Incredible Years developer Carolyn Webster-Stratton. This series will provide in depth discussion and tips for reading with young children at various developmental stages (babies, toddlers, and preschool).

Stay tuned!

~The Incredible Years Team

 

Reference

Fernald, A., Marchman, V. A. and Weisleder, A. (2013), SES differences in language processing skill and vocabulary are evident at 18 months. Developmental Science, 16: 234–248. doi: 10.1111/desc.12019


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Teacher Classroom Management – Research and New Videos

Hello and Happy October!

The Incredible Years® (IY) Teacher Classroom Management (TCM) Program is intended to help teachers (of children ages 3-8) strengthen their classroom management strategies. It helps teachers learn fun, new ways to promote children’s prosocial behavior, school readiness, and also reduce children’s classroom aggression and noncooperation. We have a few exciting things that we would like to share with you today about this program!

1. Important Research

2. New Videos

Research

A new article has recently been accepted for publication in the Journal of School Psychology about the IY TCM Program. Judy Hutchings, Ph.D. (in Wales) reported on a randomized control group trial (RCT) with 12 teachers and 107 students.  Her primary outcome measure was independent classroom observations that showed that there was a significant reduction in classroom off-task behavior and child negative behaviors toward the teacher as well as to teacher negative interactions with target students. The preliminary results suggest the potential impact of this program on both teacher and child behavior.

Read the article here!

A second report on the IY TCM Program came out of Ireland by Sinead McGilloway and her research team. Her randomized control group study included 24 teachers and 217 children and used independent observations as outcome measures. These results indicated that teachers who had taken part in the training were using significantly fewer negative classroom management strategies (e.g., fewer threats and less shouting) and they reported using more positive strategies.  Observations indicated  a significant decrease in emotional symptoms in the intervention group compared with the control students. Further sub-group analyses indicated those children most ‘at risk’ derived the most benefit from the program.  A recent follow-up study showed that one year later, teachers reported they continued to confidently use the positive management strategies and described the classroom as a calmer and more pleasant place to work. Satisfaction with the program was very high.

See the report here!

Several more RCTs are being conducted with the IY TCM Program at Duke University, University of Missouri, the United Kingdom and Norway. Stay tuned for more results regarding this program!

New Videos

Recently, we added a new video series to our website and YouTube channel that highlights the Teacher Classroom Management Program – have you seen it yet?! The series highlights participant reflections based on their experiences with the TCM Program. These videos are available on our website, on YouTube, and (very soon) in DVD format (contact us for a copy!)

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Schools can use these videos to encourage teacher participation in this program. Results from TCM program research show that teachers who participate in the program develop support networks with other teachers and parents, feel confident about their classroom management strategies, and report classrooms with fewer behavior problems. As a result, teachers are able to more academic teaching.

There are 8 total segments and each segment addresses a different topic…

  1. Overview of the TCM Program
  2. Foundation of the Incredible Years Teaching Pyramid
  3. Managing Classroom Misbehavior
  4. Teacher Experiences Learning the Program
  5. Trainer Experiences Working with Teachers
  6. The Bedrock of Children’s Academic Learning
  7. Research Regarding the Program
  8. Dissemination, Certification, and Need for Ongoing Support and Mentoring

Whew! That’s a lot of information to cover! Each segment is under 10 minutes, and we really hope you will take a look at these when you have some spare time. See below for the first segment, “Overview of the TCM Program” OR  click here to view all the video segments.

~The Incredible Years Team


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Guest Post – New Meta-Analysis looks at Effectiveness of Incredible Years®!

We have some exciting news to share!

This marks our FIRST Guest Post, courtesy of Incredible Years® Developer, Carolyn Webster-Stratton! Dr. Webster-Stratton has taken the time to write a summary of a new meta-analysis that has just been published, examining the effectiveness of the Incredible Years® Parent program. The full paper can be purchased online, here.

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Summary of Meta-Analysis Examining the Incredible Years® Parent Programs

Written by Carolyn Webster-Stratton

A new meta-analysis paper has just been published by a Dutch team. This review examines the effectiveness of the Incredible Years® parent training to reduce disruptive behavior and promote social competence in children.  Fifty studies were conducted where the Incredible Years® parent program was compared with a comparison control group by various researchers. Findings indicate that the Incredible Years® program is successful in improving child behavior, particularly for the most severe cases, and with a diverse range of families in different contexts.  The parent program is considered by this review to be well-established. These positive findings which are comparable across a range of studies may be interesting for policymakers, agencies and practitioners.  
Take a look at this meta-analysis which separates prevention from treatment studies and assesses intervention, child and family characteristics, and effect sizes for different outcomes. Number of sessions attended by parents was positively related to intervention effects.
The authors write, “The Incredible Years® program might have capacity to be tailored to specific characteristics and needs of families in spite of being manualized group training. Group leaders can achieve flexible applications of the manual and help parents learn to use the parenting principles to achieve their own determined goals.”

Reference:

Ankie T.A. Menting, Bram Orobio de Castro, Walter Matthys, Effectiveness of the Incredible Years Parent Training to Modify Disruptive and Prosocial Child Behavior: A Meta-Analytic Review, Clinical Psychology Review, Available online 22 July 2013, ISSN 0272-7358, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cpr.2013.07.006. (http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0272735813000949)

We are very excited about this review! We hope you will share this with others who may be interested in the research and/or the Incredible Years®.

~The Incredible Years® Team