The Incredible Years® Blog


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Preschool Curriculum Consumer Report Shows Effectiveness of Incredible Years Classroom Program

secoverpageThe National Center on Quality Teaching and Learning (NCQTL) recently released their 2015 Social Emotional Preschool Curriculum Consumer Report. This report serves as a guide for Head Start programs to assist them in selecting a social emotional curriculum for their classrooms. Seven different evidence-based programs were presented and evaluated against NCQTL’s twelve components of an effective social-emotional preschool curriculum. The Incredible Years® Classroom Dinosaur Curriculum is among the programs reviewed in the report, which highlights the positive impact of implementing IY in a classroom setting!

The twelve components used to evaluate each program are thoroughly explained in the full report, which can be found here. Each program is ranked on a scale of “No Evidence,” “Minimal Evidence,” “Some Evidence,” and “Solid, High-Quality Evidence” for each component.

Incredible Years Classroom Dinosaur School was found to have “Some Evidence” or “Solid, High-Quality Evidence” for nearly all of the twelve components! The program ranked particularly high in areas of comprehensiveness, depth for covered social, emotional and learning elements, well-designed learning activities, responsive teaching, and family involvement materials. Download a PDF of the entire Incredible Years report here, or access the full downloadable report online to learn more about the programs evaluated and how Incredible Years can be used to teach social, emotional, and academic skills in a classroom setting.

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New Research on Incredible Years® at Society for Research on Educational Effectiveness (SREE)

New Randomized Control Group Study Presented Using the Incredible Years® (IY) Teacher Classroom Management (TCM) Program for Training Primary Grade Teachers at the Society for Research on Educational Effectiveness (March 2014)

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Initial Findings of Randomized Control Group Trial Evaluating the Incredible Years® Teacher Classroom Management (TCM) Program for Training Primary Grade Teachers

Wendy Reinke and Keith Herman, along with their team at the University of Missouri, recently presented a paper evaluating the effectiveness of the TCM Training Program for improving primary grade teachers’ (K-3) classroom management practices and improving student social, emotional and academic outcomes.

SREE Conference Presentation (click the link to view the conference presentation!)

Study design was a blocked cluster randomized wait-list control trial where over a 3 year period 105 teachers were randomized within schools (52 intervention and 53 control teachers and 1818 students) to an intervention teacher training condition (IY TCM) or wait-list control condition.

The IY TCM Program was delivered to intervention condition teachers grades K-3 in 6 full day training workshops spread throughout the year. Plus teachers got on-site coaching between workshop sessions. Coaches spent time with teachers providing modeling, performance feedback, individual behavior plan action planning and goal setting.

Results showed that according to independent observations intervention teachers used more proactive management strategies and students had fewer problems with emotional regulation and increased prosocial skills. Students with the poorest academic competence at baseline demonstrated significant improvement in academic competence compared with students in the control classrooms.

Further Analyses
In a more recent presentation (May 2014) Wendy and Keith presented data on the amount of coaching support teachers (K-3 grade only) received between workshop sessions and its relation to teacher use of proactive strategies and student outcomes for an at-risk subsample.

Results indicated that IY TCM plus coaching is a flexible approach to tailoring training and support according to individual classroom and teacher needs.

Reinke, W.M., Herman, K.C., & Dong, N. (March, 2014). A group randomized evaluation of the Incredible Years Teacher Training program.Paper presented as part of symposium entitled, What can we learn through replication? The role of individual-level risk factors and implementation supports in the impact of social-emotional learning programs on student outcomes, at the Society for Research on Educational Effectiveness, Washington, DC.

Reinke, W., Stormant, M., Herman, K., Wang, Z., Newcomer, L., King, K. 2014. Use of Coaching and Behavior Support Planning for Students With Disruptive Behavior Within a Universal Classroom Management Program. Journal of Emotional and Behavioral Disorders, 22(2) 74-82.

See our web site for some of their first papers about IY fidelity program delivery and the importance of teacher coaching and support in combination with workshop trainings.

See below a video of Wendy and Keith discussing managing classroom behavior.

 


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Be our Valentine!

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Happy Valentine’s Day, from Wally, Dina, Felicity, and the Incredible Years staff!

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Watch our fun Valentine’s Day Video, below, or by clicking here!

Also, we sent out a newsletter earlier this week that included a fun Valentine Activity you can do with a group of children, along with some helpful tips for parents and teachers to foster children’s understanding of emotions. You can read the newsletter by clicking here!

 

~The Incredible Years Team


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December Updates!

Hi all!

We wanted to remind you of a couple things that have been happening here at Incredible Years. Feel free to e-mail or call us with any questions!

1.  Thank you to all of you who took our social media survey! You provided some really helpful information and your comments are incredible. As we enter into the new year we hope to implement some of your fantastic ideas! One thing in particular we noticed was that some folks said they only recently found out IY is on Facebook and has a Blog. We hope we can all work together to help spread the word so that more people find out about these great tools for communication. Let us know how we can help!

2. WEBSITE UPDATES! We have added some VERY IMPORTANT things to our website this month!

  • Incredible Years Provider Listings: We have parents and social workers call us quite often looking for IY classes in their area. We have compile a list of IY providers for parent, teacher, and child classes and posted these to our website, here: http://incredibleyears.com/parents-teachers/looking-for-incredible-years-groups/
    You can access this page from the home page, by clicking “Parents and Teachers.” Then look on the right side of the page for the blue “Learn More” section and you will see the tab, “Looking for Incredible Years Groups?”
  • Downloadable Handouts: We have received really positive feedback about some of our blogs postings and our recently implemented “News and Tips” Newsletter. So we are transferring these (and others!) into downloadable handouts! Parents can access these, as well as group leaders, to provide to parents in your groups (or parents of children in your groups!). Parents can find the handouts here: http://incredibleyears.com/parents-teachers/articles-for-parents/
    (Go to “Parents and Teachers” then in “Learn More” click on “Articles for Parents”)Group Leaders can access the handouts here OR in the “Resources for Group Leaders” > “For Parent Programs” > “Extras for Parent Programs” – OR just click this link! http://incredibleyears.com/resources/gl/parent-program/
  • Videos for Group Leaders: You may have noticed we are posting quite a lot of new videos to the website and our YouTube channel. Many of these videos will be really useful for group leaders! They can be used as recruitment tools, to explain content/overview of the programs, and illustrate some concepts. The videos are spread out around the website, but we thought it would be useful to also compile them in one spot for group leaders. There is now a “Videos for Group Leaders” section on the main Resources for Group Leaders page. Go to the Resources for group leaders (home page, scroll down about mid way), and scroll down a bit to find the videos section.

3. Finally, we hope you are all signed up for our newsletter! Wally will be sending out his annual Christmas letter soon – he and Carolyn have been having fun putting together a Christmas story for you all!

~The Incredible Years Team


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Building Blocks for Reading with CARE with Babies

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Written by: Carolyn Webster-Stratton, Ph.D.

Did you know that there is a connection between how much you talk to your baby and his or her later reading abilities and school success?

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Studies (e.g., Hart & Risley) have shown that by 18 months, children from low-income families hear significantly fewer words in their homes than children from higher income families. One recent study from Stanford University showed that by their 3rd year, low-income children have heard 30 million fewer words than higher income children (full article can be found here). If this language exposure gap continues, by the time these children get to kindergarten they will need remediation because they are already far behind in the language and school readiness skills needed for school success. Since early vocabulary is connected to later success in reading comprehension, this language gap presents a barrier to these children’s future academic learning achievement. It was also found that TV talk not only didn’t help, but it was a barrier.

Often these parents just don’t know that it is important to talk more to their babies. The good news is that randomized control group studies show that programs such as the Incredible Years® Baby, Toddler, and Preschool Parent Series result in improvements in children’s social and emotional language skills and school readiness.  It has been shown that low income parents can successfully learn to focus their attention and learn to talk more to their babies and children using descriptive commenting, persistence, and social and emotion coaching language during child-directed play and reading interactions.

See these studies:

Preventing Conduct Problems and Improving School Readiness: Evaluation of the Incredible Years Teacher and Child Training Programs in High-Risk Schools

Preventing Conduct Problems, Promoting Social Competence: A Parent and Teacher Training Partnership in Head Start

Halting the Development of Conduct Problems in Head Start Children: The Effects of Parent Training

Here are some tips to building your baby’s language vocabulary through reading interactions. This is not about flash cards, use of Ipads or computers, or memorization of words. Rather it is about loving, child-directed conversations while reading books, playing with your child, or engaging in everyday routines. And yes, you must turn off your mobile phone 🙂

Building Blocks for Reading with CARE with Babies

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c_blockComment, point to and describe objects, colors, emotions, sounds and actions of pictures in touch-and-feel books. You don’t need to read the actual words in the book, just point to and talk about the pictures using your native language.  For example, “Teddy’s nose is yellow. Baby is hungry. The train is slowing down.” Allow your baby to touch the book and even to put it in his/her mouth.

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a_blockAct enthusiastic using physical dramatizations and sound effect.  For example, “that is a bird, he goes chirp chirp.” (Use your hands to make a chirp sign). Use a melodious voice varying the pace, phrasing, voice rhythm and pitch of your words.  Pause between sounds or vocalizations to allow your baby to respond.

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Respond with smiles, encouragement, eye contact, cuddling and delight to your baby’s smiles, body signals and pointing movements; follow what your baby is looking at and be child-directed in what you respond to.

 

e_blockExpand on your baby’s sounds.  If your baby says a syllable such as “la la” or “da da,” mirror or repeat the sound. Or, if your baby says “ball,” repeat the word and add a descriptor such as the color or shape of the ball.  “Yes, that’s a big, red ball!” If you have other children, read what they like while you are holding your baby. Let them read to your baby and imitate your baby’s sounds. Start reading at any page and make up your own stories or sing while you are looking at the book.

Remember:

• Be sure your baby’s head is supported and you are both sitting in a comfortable chair.  You might use a pillow or a sling to support your baby so that your hands are free.

• Read in a quiet place. Turn off any competing noises such as TV, stereo, or radio; this will also prevent overstimulation or stress.

•  There will be variability in individual baby’s interest in books, so don’t worry if your baby does not seem intently interested or starts crying.  Respond to your baby’s cues.  If (s)he seems fussy or uninterested in the book, try changing your tone or reading a different book.  If these new strategies do not engage him/her, then stop trying to read, and do another soothing activity with your baby. Try again later.

For more information, see the Incredible Years® Parents and Babies Program, and the book, Incredible Babies: Ways to Promote Your Baby’s Social, Emotional and Language Development by Carolyn Webster-Stratton.

Next week, we will bring you part 2 of this 3 part series: Reading with CARE for Toddlers.

References

Hart, Betty & Risley, Todd R.American parenting of language-learning children: Persisting differences in family-child interactions observed in natural home environments. Developmental Psychology, Vol 28(6), Nov 1992, 1096-1105. doi: 10.1037/0012-1649.28.6.1096
Fernald, A., Marchman, V. A. and Weisleder, A. (2013), SES differences in language processing skill and vocabulary are evident at 18 months. Developmental Science, 16: 234–248. doi: 10.1111/desc.12019
Reid, J. M., Webster-Stratton, C., Baydar, N. 2004. Halting the Development of Conduct Problems in Head Start Children: The Effects of Parent Training. Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology. Vol.33(2) 279-291.
Webster-Stratton, C., Reid, M. J., University of WA, & Stoolmiller, M. 2008. Preventing Conduct Problems and Improving School Readiness: Evaluation of The Incredible Years Teacher and Child Training Programs in High-Risk Schools. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry. 49 (5), 471-488.
Webster-Stratton, C., Reid, M. J. & Hammond, M. School of Nursing, University of Washington. Preventing Conduct Problems, Promoting Social Competence: A Parent and Teacher Training Partnership in Head Start. Journal of Clinical Child Psychology. Copyright 2001 by Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc.
Content of this blog ©The Incredible Years®